adjustable rate mortgages Defined An ARM, short for "adjustable rate mortgage", is a mortgage on which the interest rate is not fixed for the entire life of the loan. The rate is fixed for a period at the beginning, called the "initial rate period", but after that it may change based on movements in an interest rate.

How to Pay Off your Mortgage in 5 Years  · That’s because the interest rate on variable loans could start out lower than on fixed-rate loans, and then can increase over time. For adjustable-rate mortgages with an initial fixed-rate period, if you know you’ll be flipping the home or selling it before rates increase significantly, a variable rate could be a money saver.

7 Year Arm Interest Rates 5-Year Adjustable-Rate Mortgages (ARMs) Since 2005 – Freddie Mac – Opinions, estimates, forecasts and other views contained in this document are those of Freddie Mac’s Economic & Housing Research group, do not necessarily represent the views of Freddie Mac or its management, should not be construed as indicating Freddie Mac’s business prospects or expected results, and are subject to change without notice.Fully Indexed Rate The Fully-Indexed Rate on an Option ARM. The FIR is the current value of the rate index used by the ARM, plus a margin which varies from one transaction to another, but stays the same through the life of any one ARM. For example, a widely used index on monthly ARMs is COFI, standing for cost of funds index.3 Year Arm Mortgage Rate 3/1 ARM Mortgage Explained – Financial Web – finweb.com – A 3/1 arm (adjustable-rate mortgage) is a type of mortgage that is very commonly offered today. If you are considering this type of mortgage, you will want to make sure that you understand exactly what is involved with it. Here are the basics of the 3/1 ARM.

For an adjustable-rate mortgage, the index is a benchmark interest rate that reflects general market conditions and the margin is a number set by your lender when you apply for your loan. The index and margin are added together to become your interest rate when your initial rate expires.

The answer is B. Adjustable rate mortgage is a mortgage loan where the interest rate stays for for a certain period of time then it changes either up or down based on an index. It is also called variable-rate mortgage or tracker mortgage.

Variable Mortgage Definition A variable-rate mortgage, adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM), or tracker mortgage is a mortgage loan with the interest rate on the note periodically adjusted based on an index which reflects the cost to the lender of borrowing on the credit markets. The loan may be offered at the lender’s standard variable.

An adjustable rate mortgage is a home loan with an interest rate that can change over time. In most cases, an adjustable rate mortgage will have a low fixed-interest rate during the introductory.

It’s true that you could save money by using an adjustable-rate mortgage loan. But your savings will probably be limited to the first 1 – 5 years of the term. After that, your interest rate might rise to a higher level than a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage. We will discuss all of this in detail below.

When rates start to go up, an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) starts to make a lot of sense. However, while most consumers responsibly carry an ARM, there have been situations where the ARM didn’t make financial sense, and as a result, the loan earned a tarnished reputation.

Arm Loans Explained The rate on your adjustable rate mortgage is determined by some market index. Many adjustable rate mortgages are tied to the LIBOR, Prime rate, Cost of Funds Index, or other index.The index your mortgage uses is a technicality, but it can affect how your payments change.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages. Fannie Mae purchases or securitizes fully amortizing ARMs that are originated under its standard or negotiated plans. For maximum.

The most popular adjustable-rate mortgage is the 5/1 ARM. The 5/1 ARM’s introductory rate lasts for five years. (That’s the "5" in 5/1.) After that, the interest rate can change once a year.